http://www.tiipsys.com/2016/04/how-to-enable-or-disable-system.html

Monday, April 18, 2016

Speed Up Time Machine by Removing Low Process Priority Throttling

Speed up Time Machine







It’s well known that all Mac users should set up Time Machine to automate backups of their computer, and while most Mac users let OS X go about backing up to Time Machine at it’s own pace, which sometimes borderlines on glacial, some users may wish to speed the backup process up a bit. With the help of the command line you can do just that and dramatically speed up the Time Machine backup process, but there are some major caveats to this trick because it applies beyond Time Machine, making it appropriate for advanced Mac users only, and used on a limited basis.
First, understand that Time Machine is meant to run in the background automatically, and to not be a total nuisance it runs at a reduced priority so that it doesn’t consume all available system resources to get the job done. This makes the Mac usable while Time Machine is backing up, but it has the downside of making Time Machine taking longer than it theoretically could. The way this trick works is by removing that reduced priority, but, the caveat with this approach is that it impacts more than simply Time Machine, it removes the low priority throttle from anything at the kernel level. Thus, this is why it’s only recommended for advanced users, and for limited use cases, because you could easily find yourself with all sorts of tasks taking up inordinately high CPU as a result. This is why this is not really a recommended approach, and no, this isnot intended to be a solution for when a Time Machine backup is going slower than it should, which typically requires minimal troubleshooting to resolve.
Don’t mind the caveat and potential issues with adjusting processor priority? Then launch Terminal app found in /Applications/Utilities/ and run the following command:
sudo sysctl debug.lowpri_throttle_enabled=0
Using sudo requires the admin password as usual, once entered the effect is immediate. You can either let a backup begin on it’s own, or manually start oneyourself.
If you run this command and check the time remaining on a backup you’ll notice the number remaining should speed up considerably, but CPU use goes way up for the backup daemon and Mac performance takes a hit.
The change can be reversed with a reboot, or by issuing the following command syntax in the terminal:
sudo sysctl debug.lowpri_throttle_enabled=1
If you like the general idea behind this and don’t mind taxing CPU to complete backups with Time Machine, a better approach would be to target Time Machine and backupd directly, you can adjust an apps CPU priority specifically with an app like reniceor if you’re savvy in the command line, directly with the nice and renice commands themselves. We’ll cover the renice command separately in a separate article, but in preliminary testing it certainly works to achieve the same objective, but on a limited basis to Time Machine processes.
Remember, this is not a solution to slow Time Machine backups in general, which can be fixed through troubleshooting methods.
Thanks to MacKungFu for the uncovering this interesting trick. And if you really love this idea and want to have it enable itself automatically after a reboot, you can drop this plist file into /Library/LaunchDaemons and load it with launchctl, but we do not recommend doing that.
Share:

Opening DOCX Files on a Mac, Without Microsoft Office

Mac users may encounter DOCX files from time to time, often sent from a Windows user as an email attachment or otherwise, as the .docx file types are standard document files created in newer versions of Microsoft Office. But what if you don’t have Office on the Mac? That’s ok too, even if you don’t have Office installed in Mac OS X, you can still open, read, and edit docx files on modern versions of Mac OS X, most often without any added software.

We’ll show you how to open a docx file in Text Edit and Pages in Mac OS X. Of course, if the Mac has Microsoft Office, then you can use Office to open the .docx file too.

How to Open a DOCX File in Mac OS X with Text Edit

The Text Edit application is surprisingly versatile and can easily view and edit the vast majority of docx files on a Mac. This is also the easiest way to open a docx file in OS X, which some modern versions serving as the default opener for .docx file type, but sometimes you may need to
  1. Go to the /Applications/ folder and open TextEdit
  2. Locate the .docx file you wish to open in TextEdit and drag and drop the file on the TextEdit icon in the Dock *
Opening a docx file in TextEdit on Mac
* Some versions of Mac OS X will default to associating and opening a .docx file with TextEdit
The TextEdit method works to open, view, and edit the vast majority of Docx files that a Mac may encounter. For simple text based docx files, this can often be an adequate solution to view and adjust a docx file, save it, and then return to the sender or whatever else is necessary to perform with the file in question.
There is one potential hiccup however, in that some complex docx files or those with significant formatting may render inappropriately in TextEdit, making it less than an ideal environment to edit a docx file in. If you encounter that type of display errors when loading a docx file into TextEdit, you can turn to the Pages app, which comes installed by default on most Mac computers otherwise is available from the Mac App Store.

How to Open DOCX Files with Pages in Mac OS X

Pages for Mac does a very good job of rendering complex formatting found within more complicated docx files, and thus if the document looks weird or doesn’t show up properly in TextEdit, Pages is the solution (aside from installing Microsoft Office, of course):
  1. Open the Pages app in Mac OS X (found in /Applications/ folder)
  2. Pull down the “File” menu and choose “Open” (or “Import” depending on the version of Pages)
  3. Navigate to and select the target .docx file you want to open in Pages and choose to open that from the file browser
Opening a docx file in Pages for Mac OS X
Pages should display the docx file without any formatting issues or problems, and it should look exactly as it arrived from the Windows or Microsoft Office world.
Another significant perk to opening a docx file in Pages is that you can save any Pages file as Word doc and docx format, making it easy to save and transmit the file to users on Windows or in a Microsoft Office environment, knowing that it will be fully compatible on their end. If you prefer the way Pages handles the files, you may wish to change the file app association for all docx types to open with Pages rather than another app on the Mac.
If you’re still having trouble viewing the DOCX file correctly in Mac OS X (or opening the file at all), you can turn to the command line and convert a docx file to simple doc format with textutil, which is admittedly a more complex task than using TextEdit or Pages since it involves a terminal command. The same terminal utility also allows for batch conversion to text (TXT) format as well, just in case you have a ton of files you want to read the contents of, but don’t care about the formatting attached. Those situations can be great for standard document files where the data contained within the file is important, but the formatting or rich media of a document is not.
Finally, another option for some stubborn files is to use a free tool from Microsoft calledOpen XML Converter. Open XML Converter allows you to convert Open XML files that were created in Office 2008 for Mac or Office 2007 for Windows so that you can open, edit, and save them in earlier versions of Office for Mac. This can be an ideal solution for users who are spanning many release versions of Office, Mac OS X, and Windows, as it allows for greater compatibility in many cases.
Share:

How to Enable Wi-Fi Calling on iPhone

Wi-Fi Calling on iPhone with ATT
Most major cellular carrier networks support a feature known as Wi-Fi Calling, and now you can enable wi-fi calling on the iPhone as well.
For the unfamiliar, Wi-Fi calling essentially uses an available wireless network for phone calls to improve the connection quality, rather than relying entirely on the cellular network. The result is generally cleaner and crisper sounding call quality, similar to the difference audibly observed through other Voice Over IP services like Skype and FaceTime Audio.
Another significant perk to wi-fi calling is that you’ll be able to make and receive phone calls even if your iPhone is in an area where you otherwise wouldn’t have cellular service, assuming the area or region does have wi-fi. This is a really common scenario in many cities and buildings, and this is really where wi-fi calling is at its best.
Wi-Fi calling is available now on most new iPhone models with most cellular carriers, though some devices may need to be running the latest version of iOS to have access to the feature.

Enabling Wi-Fi Calling on iPhone

Assuming your iPhone and cellular provider supports wi-fi calling, here’s how to enable this feature:
  1. Open the Settings app and go to “Phone”
  2. Tap on “Wi-Fi Calling” and toggle the switch for “Wi-Fi Calling on This iPhone” to enable the feature
  3. Read the confirmation dialog and tap on ‘Enable” to enable wi-fi calling, you’ll then be brought to a few pages of terms and conditions and important details* about the wi-fi calling feature dependent on your cellular provider, agree to the terms to continue enabling the feature
How to enable Wi-Fi calling on iPhone
Once enabled the Wi-Fi calling button will be green.
Enable Wi-Fi Calling on iPhone
You’ll want to be sure to review the emergency information, because if you were to dial emergency services from a location with wi-fi calling, it’s the information that is relayed to the responder. This is important and not something to overlook or ignore, and also shows the potential downside to the wi-fi calling feature, since the set address doesn’t change with your location, whereas a typical cellular signal can be triangulated for a general idea. If you decide this is not appropriate for your situation, you can always turn wi-fi calling back off again.
Once Wi-Fi Calling is active and you join a wi-fi network with the iPhone, you should see the cellular carrier data change in the upper left corner of iPhone to demonstrate the feature has been enabled and is active. This looks like AT&T Wi-Fi, Sprint Wi-Fi, Verizon Wi-Fi, T-Mobile Wi-Fi, and so on (for those who may be wondering, the numbers next to the carrier name are the cellular signal strength as shown from Field Test Mode, which can replace the usual signal dot indicators if you’d like).
Wi-Fi Calling on iPhone with ATT
As mentioned before, wi-fi calling is really most helpful if your cellular connection service is poor, but you have a wi-fi network to connect to. This can help to eliminate the no-signal zones that are often found in office buildings and parts of a town where some obstruction blocks a clear cellular signal.
* All cellular providers will relay some important information to the user when enabling wi-fi calling. Perhaps the most important element pertains to emergency services and the requirement of setting an emergency address. For AT&T, the entire notification for enabling wi-fi calling is as follows:
“Important Information
Using Wi-Fi Calling. Wi-Fi Calling allows you to communicate through calls and text messages over an existing Wi-Fi network. To use Wi-Fi Calling, your device must be set up for AT&T HD voice, and you must have access to the Internet through your device’s Wi-Fi connection. Your device will only route calls and texts over Wi-Fi Calling when cellular coverage is limited or unavailable (for example, in some indoor locations where it is difficult for a strong wireless signal to reach or when your device is in airplane mode with Wi-Fi enabled). If you lose your Internet connection during a voice call with Wi-Fi Calling, your call will disconnect unless you are also within AT&T HD Voice coverage. You can disable Wi-Fi Calling by toggling it off in your device settings menu.
You can use Wi-Fi Calling for voice calls within the U.S., Puerto Rico, or U.S. Virgin Islands at no additional charge. However, if you have a capped or pay-per-use text messaging plan, your text messages sent through Wi-Fi Calling will be billed at standard messaging rates in accordance with your messaging plan. If you make international long distance voice calls using Wi-Fi Calling, you will be charged international rates consistent with your applicable rate plan or optional international long distance calling package that you have purchased. For a list of AT&T international long distance calling rates and packages, please visit att.com/worldconnect. You cannot use Wi-Fi Calling outside of the U.S., Puerto Rico, or U.S. Virgin Islands. Due to technical limitations, Wi-Fi Calling cannot be used to initiate calls to 211, 311, 511, and 811.
TTY Limitations for 911 Calls. Due to technical limitations, Wi-Fi Calling cannot be used with TTY devices and will not support 911 calls over TTY devices. Persons with communications disabilities can still reach 911 services by either (1) calling 911 directly using a TTY over the cellular network or a landline telephone, or (2) sending a text message to 911 directly (in areas where text-to-911 is available) using a wireless device over the cellular network, or (3) using relay services to place a TTY or captioned telephone service (CTS) call over the cellular network or a landline telephone, or (4) using relay services to place a IP Relay or IP CTS call over a cellular data or other IP network.
911 Call Routing. If you make a 911 call using Wi-Fi Calling, we will attempt to route your call to the emergency response center for your location using automatic location information obtained from your device and the existing Wi-Fi network. If we are unable to route your call using automatic location information, we will use the Emergency Address stored in the Wi-Fi Calling settings on your device. During initial activation of Wi-Fi Calling your current billing address will be shown as the Emergency Address. You can change your Wi-Fi Calling Emergency Address during activation or at any time after activation by selecting “Update Emergency Address” in the Wi-Fi Calling menu on your device. Your Emergency Address cannot be a P.O. Box. 911 service may be limited by comparison to traditional E911 service, delayed or unavailable if we are unable to locate you using automatic location information and you use Wi-Fi Calling at a location different from the Emergency Address you stored in your device. To ensure proper routing of emergency calls please keep your Wi-Fi Calling Emergency Address up to date. If you lose your Internet connection during a Wi-Fi Calling 911 call, your call will be disconnected even if you are also in AT&T HD Voice coverage. To print a warning label as a reminder of these 911 limitations press-hold, copy and print the following text on a label that can be affixed to your device:
Emergency service from this device using Wi-Fi Calling may be limited in comparison to traditional 911 service.
By selecting “Continue” below, you acknowledge that you have received and understand the foregoing limitations regarding the ability to place 911 calls using Wi-Fi Calling, and you further agree that if you dial 911 on this device using Wi-Fi Calling, AT&T may treat the automatic location information transmitted by your device as your temporarily updated Wi-Fi Calling Emergency Address.”
Other cellular providers will have a similar notification, be sure to read and understand the limitations and details before using the wi-fi calling service on any network.
Share:

Thursday, April 14, 2016

How to change the country for your Apple ID, App Store or iTunes Store

Country change
There are a couple of methods to change the region for your Apple ID, but why someone will do that? There could be various reasons that a user may want to change the country for his/her Apple ID. Some of them are as follows;
  • A user has moved to a different country for work or any other purpose
  • You want to download Apps (ex: Spotify), but those are not available for your region
  • You are a developer or blogger, and want the content based on a specific country
Earlier told a method to change the country, but that don’t work any more. Now you have only 2 ways to change the country for Apple ID;
  1. Add or Change Credit Card Detail for Apple ID that should belong to the country you want to switch to. It can be done with existing account
  2. Create a new Apple ID, and select the country of your choice. No payment information required

1. Changing Country Along with Payment Detail

This option is basically for those who have really moved to a different country, but there are still exceptions. Adding Payment information is temporary, and you can remove Credit Card Detail from Apple Account after changing the country. So a temporary working credit card will also do this job. There are some companies that provide Virtual Credit Card, and you can get in touch with them if they can provide a US based card (or the country you want). If they do, you are good to go, because they usually provide Master or Visa card that Apple accepts.
Once you have the Payment Information ready, follow these steps to change the country
Mac Users
  • You can launch iTunes or App store on Mac
  • If using iTunes click on your Name/Apple ID, and Select Account Info
From iTunes
  • If using App Store, click on Account
From App Store
Rest of the steps are same for both
  • Click on Change Country or Region under Account Information Section
Changing Country Apple ID
  • Select the country from drop down list, and click Change
Select Country for Apple ID
  • Now you may get a page where you need to click on continue, and then accept terms and conditions
  • The last step is to provide the valid payment information along with a valid billing address and mobile number. Once you are done you can save it
Note : Changing the country without being their include some risks, like you may not receive sms/verification code via sms from Apple or for Keychain verification in future unless you actually own that mobile number.
iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch Users
  • Launch iTunes Store or App Store
  • Click on your Apple ID at the bottom, and hit View Apple ID, and then Enter Password to manage
Apple ID on iPHone View App ID
  • Now Tap on Country/Region
iPhone Country Option
  • Select Change Country or Region
Change Country from iPhone
  • Rest of the steps are same as on Mac. You need to select the Country you want to choose for your Apple ID, Enter the Payment information, billing address as in new country and save.

2. Create New Apple ID to change country without payment information

You can visit Apple ID creation page, and create a new ID filling the information there. Get the help of Fake ID Generator to find dummy phone number, address and PO Box. While Creating a new ID, you can choose the country of your choice without providing any Payment information. However, keep in mind that such accounts are not secure, and password retrieval, or iCloud verification may be tough or even impossible. It’s better to use such account for testing purpose only, and have a personal valid Apple ID.

Source Url and Image: How to change the country for your Apple ID, App Store or iTunes Store
Share:

How to Use “Hey Siri” on Apple Watch

hey-siri-apple-watch-use
The Apple Watch has the same “Hey Siri” voice based activation feature available to it that iOS does, but it works a bit different and doesn’t activate exactly the same. In fact, there are two ways to activate Hey Siri on the Apple Watch, neither of which is quite like the iPhone based summoning method.

The trick with using Hey Siri on Apple Watch is that the screen must be lit up on the device. Aside from that, the feature is always enabled for use (unless you turn it off). That is how it’s different from enabling Hey Siri on iPhone, which is always waiting for a voice command from anywhere within voice shot as long as the feature is turned on to begin with (at least with newer model iPhones).
This means you have two ways of activating “Hey Siri” voice commands on Apple Watch; by raising the Watch wrist, or by having the screen on and then issuing a command.

Raise the Apple Watch Wrist and Say “Hey Siri”

This is the most common method for users to activate Hey Siri on Apple Watch. Simply raise the wrist you’re wearing the Apple Watch on, and say “Hey Siri”, followed by your voice command.
hey-siri-wrist-raise-apple-watch
You can also raise the wrist and string the full command into a sentence like “Hey Siri, what time is it in Fiji”.
watch-siri

Tap the Watch Screen, Then Say “Hey Siri”

Tapping on the Apple Watch with a finger, nose, or other appendage, so that the screen is lit up, then allows you to follow with the traditional “Hey Siri” command prefix to activate the feature.
screen-apple-watch
Once Siri is listening, just follow it up with a command, or speak the entire command in a full sequence as usual, like “Hey Siri send a message to Mom saying hello how are you”.
hey-siri-apple-watch
Of course you can always use Siri on Apple Watch by samply holding down the Digital Crown button on the side of the device too, but that’s not the same as triggering the “Hey Siri” voice activation feature.

Source Url and Image: How to Use “Hey Siri” on Apple Watch
Share:

Check Packages for Expired Certificates in Mac OS X

How to check package files for expired certificates
Many Mac users will download package files of combo updates or other software in order to install them on multiple computers, thereby avoiding updating with the Mac App Store. This is particularly common with Mac systems administrators, where it makes more sense to download a single package update or installer once and distribute it over a network or perhaps install manually through a USB drive. There is nothing wrong with this approach at all, and in fact it’s much more efficient for multi-Mac management, but one potential hiccup arrives when a package installer or update file has an expired certificate, which will prevent the package from installing entirely, a situation that becomes obvious when you get an “(application installer) was signed with a certificate that has expired” error message.

To avoid this situation, you can check package signatures yourself to see if they are valid, if they have expired, or even if they have no signature at all.

How to Check Package Signature Status in Mac OS X with pkgutil

The excellent pkgutil command line utility can easily determine the status of any package signature and certificate. It’s easy to use, so launch the Terminal app from /Applications/Utilities/ and try it out yourself.
The basic syntax to use for checking a package signature status is like so:
pkgutil --check-signature /Path/to/Example.pkg
Hit return and you’ll find out if the signature is valid, if the signature has expired, or if there is no signature at all.
For example, let’s say we have an Mac OS X Combo Update software installer package, a common scenario for sysadmins updating multiple Macs, you could check the status of that packages signature like so:
pkgutil --check-signature ~/Downloads/OSXUpdateCombo10.10.2.pkg
Package "OSXUpdateCombo10.10.2.pkg":
Status: signed by a certificate that has since expired

In this case, the signature for the update package has expired, meaning it will throw an error if usage is attempted.
Not all package installers have signatures however, and while any software update file from Apple will, packages from third parties often do not. For example, this example package installer file has no signature, and should be treated appropriately (i.e. if you don’t trust the source, perhaps reconsider using it).
pkgutil --check-signature ~/Downloads/MysterySketchyInstaller-21.pkg
Package "MysterySketchyInstaller-21.pkg":
Status: no signature

If a package file is dubious, you can verify the code signature and extract the package without installing it with pkgutil to give it a further inspection, or if you prefer to use the GUI then an app like Pacifist offers similar package management tools in a friendlier interface, even if it’s still on the advanced side of things.
Like all good command line tools, you can even feed pkgutil wildcards to easily check multiple packages at the same time, in this example we’ll check the signature of every *.pkg file contained within ~/Downloads:
pkgutil --check-signature ~/Downloads/*.pkg
Package "irssi-0.8.17-0.pkg":
Status: no signature

Package "wget-4.8.22-0.pkg":
Status: no signature
Package "ComboUpdateOSXElCapitan.pkg":
Status: signed by a certificate that has since expired
Package "InstallOSXSequoiaBeta.pkg":
Status: valid
Package "HRFDeveloperTools.pkg":
Status: valid

Wildcards will make quick work of checking certificate status of many different package files, just be sure you specify *.pkg for the process to complete without stopping on a file that is not a recognized package.

Source Url and Image: Check Packages for Expired Certificates in Mac OS X
Share:

How to Remove a Disk from Time Machine on Mac

Time Machine in Mac OS X All Mac users should have regular automatic backups setup with Time Machine, it’s easy to use and ensures that your personal data and entire Mac is recoverable in the event something goes wrong with the computer. Some people go even further and setup redundant Time Machine backups with multiple disks for added data protection. But sometimes you may decide a particular disk drive is no longer needed by Time Machine, and thus you’d like to remove that particular drive from the backup process without disabling all other Time Machine backups. This can be easily done, and all it does is stop backing up to the particular drive in question, it does not turn off Time Machine to other volumes, and it does not delete any of the backups on the removed drive.

Deleting a Hard Drive from Time Machine Backup to Stop Backups to That Drive from a Mac

Note that you do not need to have the drive connected to the Mac to remove it from Time Machine, this process is the same in all versions of OS X:
  1. Pull down the  Apple menu and choose ‘System Preferences’
  2. Go to the Time Machine system preference panel, then scroll down in the drive list to find “Add or Remove Backup Disk” and click that
  3. Click to remove a Time Machine drive
  4. Select the hard drive, disk, or backup volume that you want to remove from Time Machine backups, then click on “Remove Disk”
  5. Select the drive to remove from Time Machine backups
  6. Confirm that you want to remove the drive from Time Machine and stop backing up to the disk in question
  7. Confirm to remove the drive and stop backups to that particular volume from Time Machine
  8. Exit out of System Preferences when finished
The removed drive will no longer be part of the Time Machine backup chain, meaning when it’s connected to the Mac it will no longer trigger the automatic backup process. Additionally, manually started Time Machine backups will also no longer go to the removed drive when it is connected.
Again, this does not delete any of the data from the Time Machine drive, it simply stops backing up to the drive that has been removed. This also does not turn off Time Machine.
If you want to, you can remove the actual Time Machine backup files from the drive in question yourself, or even format the drive to be Mac compatible and wipe it completely clean of any other data. There’s also nothing wrong with leaving the files there if you think you’ll need it again down the road or refer to them in the future.
Regardless, you’ll want to be sure you have some form of backup going to Time Machine or to another service, never let your Mac or iOS devices go without backups!

Source Url and Image:  How to Remove a Disk from Time Machine on Mac
Share:

Subscribe to TIIPSYS

Subscribe to RSS Subscribe to Twitter Feed Follow on Facebook Subscribe to eMail Updates