Showing posts with label OS. Show all posts
Showing posts with label OS. Show all posts

Thursday, April 14, 2016

Check Packages for Expired Certificates in Mac OS X

How to check package files for expired certificates
Many Mac users will download package files of combo updates or other software in order to install them on multiple computers, thereby avoiding updating with the Mac App Store. This is particularly common with Mac systems administrators, where it makes more sense to download a single package update or installer once and distribute it over a network or perhaps install manually through a USB drive. There is nothing wrong with this approach at all, and in fact it’s much more efficient for multi-Mac management, but one potential hiccup arrives when a package installer or update file has an expired certificate, which will prevent the package from installing entirely, a situation that becomes obvious when you get an “(application installer) was signed with a certificate that has expired” error message.

To avoid this situation, you can check package signatures yourself to see if they are valid, if they have expired, or even if they have no signature at all.

How to Check Package Signature Status in Mac OS X with pkgutil

The excellent pkgutil command line utility can easily determine the status of any package signature and certificate. It’s easy to use, so launch the Terminal app from /Applications/Utilities/ and try it out yourself.
The basic syntax to use for checking a package signature status is like so:
pkgutil --check-signature /Path/to/Example.pkg
Hit return and you’ll find out if the signature is valid, if the signature has expired, or if there is no signature at all.
For example, let’s say we have an Mac OS X Combo Update software installer package, a common scenario for sysadmins updating multiple Macs, you could check the status of that packages signature like so:
pkgutil --check-signature ~/Downloads/OSXUpdateCombo10.10.2.pkg
Package "OSXUpdateCombo10.10.2.pkg":
Status: signed by a certificate that has since expired

In this case, the signature for the update package has expired, meaning it will throw an error if usage is attempted.
Not all package installers have signatures however, and while any software update file from Apple will, packages from third parties often do not. For example, this example package installer file has no signature, and should be treated appropriately (i.e. if you don’t trust the source, perhaps reconsider using it).
pkgutil --check-signature ~/Downloads/MysterySketchyInstaller-21.pkg
Package "MysterySketchyInstaller-21.pkg":
Status: no signature

If a package file is dubious, you can verify the code signature and extract the package without installing it with pkgutil to give it a further inspection, or if you prefer to use the GUI then an app like Pacifist offers similar package management tools in a friendlier interface, even if it’s still on the advanced side of things.
Like all good command line tools, you can even feed pkgutil wildcards to easily check multiple packages at the same time, in this example we’ll check the signature of every *.pkg file contained within ~/Downloads:
pkgutil --check-signature ~/Downloads/*.pkg
Package "irssi-0.8.17-0.pkg":
Status: no signature

Package "wget-4.8.22-0.pkg":
Status: no signature
Package "ComboUpdateOSXElCapitan.pkg":
Status: signed by a certificate that has since expired
Package "InstallOSXSequoiaBeta.pkg":
Status: valid
Package "HRFDeveloperTools.pkg":
Status: valid

Wildcards will make quick work of checking certificate status of many different package files, just be sure you specify *.pkg for the process to complete without stopping on a file that is not a recognized package.

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How to Remove a Disk from Time Machine on Mac

Time Machine in Mac OS X All Mac users should have regular automatic backups setup with Time Machine, it’s easy to use and ensures that your personal data and entire Mac is recoverable in the event something goes wrong with the computer. Some people go even further and setup redundant Time Machine backups with multiple disks for added data protection. But sometimes you may decide a particular disk drive is no longer needed by Time Machine, and thus you’d like to remove that particular drive from the backup process without disabling all other Time Machine backups. This can be easily done, and all it does is stop backing up to the particular drive in question, it does not turn off Time Machine to other volumes, and it does not delete any of the backups on the removed drive.

Deleting a Hard Drive from Time Machine Backup to Stop Backups to That Drive from a Mac

Note that you do not need to have the drive connected to the Mac to remove it from Time Machine, this process is the same in all versions of OS X:
  1. Pull down the  Apple menu and choose ‘System Preferences’
  2. Go to the Time Machine system preference panel, then scroll down in the drive list to find “Add or Remove Backup Disk” and click that
  3. Click to remove a Time Machine drive
  4. Select the hard drive, disk, or backup volume that you want to remove from Time Machine backups, then click on “Remove Disk”
  5. Select the drive to remove from Time Machine backups
  6. Confirm that you want to remove the drive from Time Machine and stop backing up to the disk in question
  7. Confirm to remove the drive and stop backups to that particular volume from Time Machine
  8. Exit out of System Preferences when finished
The removed drive will no longer be part of the Time Machine backup chain, meaning when it’s connected to the Mac it will no longer trigger the automatic backup process. Additionally, manually started Time Machine backups will also no longer go to the removed drive when it is connected.
Again, this does not delete any of the data from the Time Machine drive, it simply stops backing up to the drive that has been removed. This also does not turn off Time Machine.
If you want to, you can remove the actual Time Machine backup files from the drive in question yourself, or even format the drive to be Mac compatible and wipe it completely clean of any other data. There’s also nothing wrong with leaving the files there if you think you’ll need it again down the road or refer to them in the future.
Regardless, you’ll want to be sure you have some form of backup going to Time Machine or to another service, never let your Mac or iOS devices go without backups!

Source Url and Image:  How to Remove a Disk from Time Machine on Mac
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Tuesday, April 12, 2016

How to View Live Photos in Messages for Mac

Play Live Photo in Messages for Mac
Live Photos are basically a still photo that comes to life as a short video, they’re a neat feature that can be captured by newer model iPhone cameras, and now the Messages app on the Mac can view these little moments if they’re sent your way.

To have access to Live Photos in Messages for Mac, you’ll need to be running OS X 10.11.4 or later, as earlier Messages versions don’t support the feature in OS X. Aside from that, you’ll just need someone with an iPhone that can take Live Photos to send the Mac one, the rest is pretty simple.

Watching Live Photos in Messages for Mac OS X

  1. In the Mac Messages app, open the message where the sender has sent you a Live Photo, the Live Photo can be indicated by the little icon in the upper left corner of the image
  2. A Live Photos is indicated by the little icon in the upper left corner of the picture
  3. Double-click on the Live Photo within Messages app to open a preview window of the picture, the live video portion will immediately play
  4. Playing a Live Photo in Messages for mac
  5. Re-play the Live Photo by clicking the little “Live” button in the lower left corner of the preview image
  6. Live photo button
Simple, easy, and works with any Mac with a compatible version of Messages app.
You can try this out yourself if you don’t have someone sending you Live Photos constantly, all you need to do is take a Live Photo with an iPhone camera and then send it to yourself via Messages in iOS so that you can view it on the Mac in the Messages client.
This is a nice feature addition to Messages for Mac, since previously the Live Photos either had to be imported into the Photos app or the sender would have to convert the Live Photo to an animated GIF before sending it over to get a similar experience (for the record, I still hope a ‘convert to gif’ option arrives in future iOS versions, but anyway…).

Source Url and Image:  How to View Live Photos in Messages for Mac
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The Mac Hosts File: How to Modify /etc/hosts in OS X with TextEdit

Edit the hosts file in TextEdit in Mac OS X
The Mac hosts file is a system level file located at /etc/hosts which maps IP addresses to host names for Mac OS X networking. Many users edit and modify the hosts file so that they can point a domain to a different IP address, whether for the purpose of local development, blocking sites, or simply to access alternate servers from various apps and system level functions. Most advanced users will edit the hosts file from the OS X Terminal using nano or vim, but for those who prefer to stay within the Mac OS GUI, you can also modify the Mac’s hosts file through TextEdit, or even a third party app like BBEdit or TextWrangler. This offers a more user friendly option compared to going through the command line.

If you don’t have a specific reason to modify the Mac hosts file in OS X, you should not do so. An incorrectly formatted hosts file or improper entry can lead to DNS issues and problems with various internet services. This is for advanced users.

How to Modify the Mac Hosts File at /etc/hosts with TextEdit OS X

This approach to changing /etc/hosts with TextEdit works with any version of OS X. For Mac users who are running OS X 10.11 or later releases, you must first disable SIP protection however, otherwise the Mac /etc/hosts file will be locked when attempting to access it from TextEdit.
  1. Quit TextEdit if it is currently open
  2. Launch the Terminal application in Mac OS X, found within /Applications/Utilities/
  3. Enter the following command exactly to open the Macs hosts file within the TextEdit GUI application
  4. sudo open -a TextEdit /etc/hosts
  5. Hit return and enter the admin password for OS X when requested to authenticate the launch through sudo
  6. How to modify the hosts file in TextEdit of Mac OS X
  7. The /etc/hosts file will launch into TextEdit as a plain text file where it can be edited and modified as need be, when finished use File > Save or hit Command+S as usual to save the changes to the hosts document *
  8. Quit out of TextEdit, then quit out of Terminal when finished
How to Edit the Mac hosts file in TextEdit for OS X
* If the hosts file shows as “locked” and won’t save changes despite being launched through sudo, it’s likely because you didn’t disable SIP as mentioned in the introduction. You can turn off SIP in OS X with these instructions, which requires a reboot of the Mac. This is necessary for modern versions of OS X, though you can choose to edit the hosts file using the command line with nano as described here without adjusting SIP.
It’s good practice to make a duplicate of the hosts file so that if you break something you can easily fix it, though we’ve got the original default hosts file here in case you need to restore it. It’s also a good idea to set plain text mode as the default for TextEdit.
You’ll likely want to clear out your DNS cache after modifying the hosts file, here’s how to flush DNS in OS X El Capitan and modern versions Mac OS and how to do the same in prior releases.
Users can also choose to modify Mac OS X’s /etc/hosts with TextWrangler, BBEdit, or another third party application. The trick is largely the same as Text Edit, still requiring the use of sudo, but changing the specified application name as follows.
Opening /etc/hosts with TextWrangler:
sudo open -a TextWrangler /etc/hosts
Or launching /etc/hosts into Bbedit:
sudo open -a BBEdit /etc/hosts
While the aforementioned approaches work in all modern versions of OS X, earlier versions of Mac OS X can also launch the TextEdit binary with hosts directly from the command line with the following syntax:
sudo ./Applications/TextEdit.app/Contents/MacOS/TextEdit /etc/hosts
That method will not work in the latest releases, however, thus you’ll want to rely on the open command instead.
Know of another trick to modify the Mac hosts file in an easy fashion through TextEdit or another GUI app? Let us know in the comments.

Source Url and Image: The Mac Hosts File: How to Modify /etc/hosts in OS X with TextEdit
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How to Change the Default System Font in OS X El Capitan to Lucida Grande

Change the Default System Font in OS X El Capitan to Lucida Grande
The Lucida Grande font is known for its crisp and obvious readability which makes it a great user interface font, and it rightfully served as the Mac OS X default system font for many years. Then along came Yosemite, where the Mac system font was changed to the generally unpopular Helvetica Neue. Apple has since improved font readability considerably by changing the default system font yet again in OS X El Capitan, this time to a new font called San Francisco. While the San Francisco font is considerably better as a display font than Helvetica Neue, it’s still not quite as readable for some Mac users and on some non-retina displays as Lucida Grande. Fortunately, with a little effort you can change the default system font on a Mac with OS X El Capitan to Lucida Grande again, and return to the classic user interface font.

This app changes the system font, used in menu bars, menus, the Finder, Dock, window title bars, and elsewhere. If you like the system font the way it is now, or don’t even care, you likely won’t benefit from this application.

Replacing the Mac System Font in OS X El Capitan to Lucida Grande (from Mavericks)

  1. Consider starting a backup of the Mac with Time Machine and waiting for it to finish if you haven’t done so in a while, it’s unlikely you’ll have any problems but backing up is good practice anyway
  2. Go here to download the El Capitan Lucida Grande app, it’s free and open source if you feel like poking around the code yourself
  3. Right-click (or Control+Click) on the “El Capitan Lucida Grande.app” file you just downloaded and choose ‘Open’ – this will launch the app beyond Gatekeeper
  4. Choose the “Patch & Install & Clear font cache” button in the launcher app, then enter the administrator password when requested, the admin login is necessary to create a new file in the /Library/Fonts/ folder, which is the system level font directory*
  5. When finished, quit out of the app and reboot the Mac for changes to take effect throughout OS X
When OS X reboots the system font will be changed to Lucida Grande from San Francisco. Here’s a before and after shown as animated GIF, the change is subtle:
Replacing the default system font in OS X before and after
Here’s a still before and after as well, this is what a Finder window and menu bar look like in OS X with the default San Francisco font (the before):
OS X El Capitan default system font of San Francisco
And here is what the same Finder window and menu bar look like in OS X with Lucida Grande font (the after):
OS X El Capitan with Lucida Grande
As you can see, the changes are extremely subtle. This animated gif gives you an idea of just how subtle the change is, with Lucida Grande being ever so slightly bolder, slightly wider, with slightly more spacing, with the result being it’s slightly more readable to some individuals.

Looks Interesting, But How Does this App Replace the System Font?

For those who might wish to understand what this app is doing to replace the system font in OS X: it’s quite simple, the “Lucida Grande El Capitan” app works by creating a new patched version of the Lucida Grande font and placing that system font file in /Library/Fonts/ called “LucidaGrande_modsysfontelc.ttc”. In other words, it’s simply creating a new font file that is recognized by OS X as being the default system font, thus when Mac OS X boots it loads that new system font file version of Lucida grande rather than San Francisco — it does not replace or modify any system files.

The Default System Fonts Are Barely Different? What’s the Point?

Indeed, going from San Francisco to Lucida Grande is much more subtle than abandoning Helvetica Neue for Lucida Grande or for Comic Sans, so if you’ve never thought twice about the system font in OS X El Capitan let alone in Yosemite or Mavericks, you probably won’t even notice the change, meaning this isn’t really aimed at you. But, for users who either just prefer Lucida Grande due to longstanding habit, or because it’s easier for them to read on a particular display, this little unofficial font patch is a nice modification to Mac OS X.
Perhaps in the future Apple will introduce a ‘bold fonts’ option in OS X Accessibility preferences to make default font text easier for some Mac users to read, much like the bold fonts choice in iOS. But that hasn’t happened yet, so in the meantime, if you’re not thrilled with the system font in OS X El Capitan, consider changing that system font back to the classic Lucida Grande, because for many it’s just easier on the eyes and easier to read.

A few known font display bugs

Indeed there are a few text kerning and spacing bugs with the initial release patch, presumably a fix will resolve those issues shortly. The most annoying is likely found in Safari where multiple tabs start squishing the text together in a tab title, here’s what it looks like:
font bug
Again, a future release of the Lucida Grande replacement font will likely resolve that issue. If it’s a dealbreaker, just uninstall it and wait for the time being.

What About Changing the Default System Font to a Different Font?

If Lucida Grande isn’t your thing, there are other options for new default system fonts in OS X El Capitan which use the same basic idea as this app, many of these existed for prior OS X releases but have yet to be modified for El Capitan. Currently, other alternatives are:
* Note that you can also install fonts and modified Mac system fonts in the user fonts folder at ~/Library/Fonts/, but doing so sometimes causes weird font display gibberish that isn’t remedied by dumping font caches in OS X, particularly with dialog and alert windows. Thus, if you’re replacing the system font, go with the root font directory.

Source Url and Image:  How to Change the Default System Font in OS X El Capitan to Lucida Grande
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Monday, April 11, 2016

How to Enable or Disable System Integrity Protection on Mac

modify SIP on Mac OS X
OS X 10.11 El Capitan is the most secure Operating System Apple has ever made. It is secured by the System Integrity Protection that limits the apps and users in root level.
Whether you are a developer or a normal user, no one is recommended to disable System Integrity Protection (SIP). If you do so, Malware, Virus or other infected files would get a chance to use this permission to make changes in your system or preinstalled files. This could make your Mac vulnerable and risk your own data and privacy.
If SIP in enabled, you can still uninstall programs on Mac, but can’t remove any system apps or modify system files. If you want to do something like that, you need to disable SIP, and then it can be done. After making changes it can be enabled again, and we will tell you how. If you are using OS X 10.10 Yosemite or older version, you can remove system apps without disabling SIP.
Note : If you don’t know what you are doing, never try it. I will not be responsible for anything happens ahead. Removing system apps or making changes in system files may make your system unstable.

How to check System Integrity Protection Status, Enable or Disable it

  • Shut down your Mac completely
  • Press Command+R key, and then press Power Key to go to the recovery screen
  • Click on Utilities, and select Terminal
Terminal on Recovery
  • Type the following command in terminal to check System Integrity Protection status. By default it is always on
csrutil status
SIP Status
  • It’s enabled as you can see in the screenshot above, and now we will disable it typing the following command
csrutil disable
Disable SIP
  • Now SIP is disabled, and you can restart your computer. Make any changes you want to do
  • After making changes, you can enable SIP again. Shut down your computer, and Press Command+R+Power Key to go to recovery screen again, open Terminal, and type the following command
csrutil enable
Enable SIP
  • Restart your computer, and enjoy enhanced security
Source Url and Image:  How to Enable or Disable System Integrity Protection on Mac
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Make Animated GIFs from Movies in Mac OS X with Drag & Drop Ease

Make a GIF from a movie in Mac OS X with Drop To Gif
Creating animated GIFs out of a movie file or or video usually requires a bit of effort, but now you can convert a movie into an animated GIF on a Mac with drag and drop simplicity, thanks to the aptly named Drop to GIF.

Drop to GIF is a free app for Mac OS X which automates the entire animated GIF creation process, all you need to do is toss a movie file into the app and the conversion begins. The app is both extremely simple and effective, so if you’re looking to make quick work of gif creation using existing movie or video files, it’s an excellent choice to get started.

Making Animated GIFs with Drop to GIF in Mac OS X

Here is how simple the movie conversion process to GIF is:
  • Get Drop to GIF from Github (free) and launch the app
  • Drag and drop any movie file into the Drop to GIF app, or the app Dock icon, to start converting the chosen video to animated GIF
  • Drop to GIF
  • When conversion is finished, look in the original directory of the movie file to find the exported animated GIF
The exported GIF will loop endlessly, and the default settings will pull the frame rate from the video and set that as the animated GIF FPS as well. Users can make changes to FPS, width size of the animated GIF output file, and GIF quality, adjusting these three settings helps to control the file size of the exported GIF, since a large high FPS animated GIF will wind up being a large file by default. To access the settings, just click on the little gear icon in the app.
Drop to GIF settings
There’s even a little handy directory watching feature, where any movie file that appears in a watched directory will instantly be converted into an animated gif. As already mentioned, any exported animated GIF file will be saved in the same directory as the originating movie was, so that directory would contain both the origin movie file and the GIF output.
Here are a few example movies that were converted using Drop to GIF, this one is a quick capture from an iPhone movie that has been compressed heavily:
Drop to GIF example creation
In this example, the original video is a simple screen recording .mov file made from QuickTime and there has been no compression or quality reduction, meaning the file is a bit on the large size:
Example GIF
For users who need more gif creation and movie conversion options, like a timeline and editing tools, a paid app like Gif Brewery for Mac allows you to convert video to GIF and make edits as well, which would perhaps be a better option for more avid GIF makers. But even if it has fewer features, Drop to GIF is an excellent app, and since it’s free there is little commitment to giving it a try and seeing if it works for your needs.
(By the way, if the Github page looks familiar to anyone, it’s because Drop to GIF arrives from the same developer who brought us the excellent simple language text editor ClearText, which is another fun little app for Mac users.)

Source Url and Image: Make Animated GIFs from Movies in Mac OS X with Drag & Drop Ease
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Thursday, April 7, 2016

How to Dim Mac’s Screen Beyond Given Limit

Mac brightness Option
Mac already comes with dedicated keys to increase or decrease the brightness of the display. MacBook users can press F1 to decrease the brightness and F2 to increase it. Decreasing to the lowest level makes the screen dark, and you can’t see anything. However, Keeping the brightness level to the lowest level (level 1), you can still decrease it further. It is not usually useful, but it could be very useful in such situation when you are traveling and each battery saving option matters for you.

How to Dim Mac’s Screen Beyond the Limit Apple has Given

  • Download the free application “Shady
  • Launch Shady on your Mac
Launch Shady
  • You will see nothing on the screen, but an additional icon will be added in menu bar
  • Click on the icon, and you can adjust the brightness from light to dark or vice versa
Shaddy
  • If you liked the app, you can put it in Application folder to use whenever you want. The app weighs just 1.7 MB, so it will not consume so much of storage
  • Quitting Shady is also easy. Simply click on Shady icon in menu bar, and select Quit Shady
Once you adjust the brightness level on Mac with F1 or F2, that is the maximum brightness level for Shady. It won’t be able to increase brightness further, but it can decrease.

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How to remove Movies, Music, Photos, Videos and Apps from iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch

Removing files from iPhone, iPad or iPod touch is not really difficult, but I have seen many people asking on forums and social media. So we will take you through the steps that can help you do that.
Note : You can’t undo deletion of Music, Apps and Videos (from Videos app). Apps need to be reinstalled once deleted. You can bring back Music and Videos syncing with iTunes again. Photos and videos under Photos app can be recovered from Recently Deleted Folder.

How to Remove Apps from iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch

  • Press and hold any app icon (don’t press harder if using 3D touch compatible device, a simple press and hold will do)
  • Now all the apps icon will start shaking, and you will see a small cross icon on the left top corner of each app
  • Tap on the cross, and tap Delete to confirm that you want to remove the app
Note : You can’t remove stock or preloaded apps from the device. However, you can learn a trick to hide stock apps from iPhone, but all those apps will appear back when you restart the device.

How to Delete Music, Songs or MP3 file from iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch

iOS do need iTunes to sync music files with iPhone, but there is no need to connect the device to a computer if you want to delete them. Follow the steps below;
  • Launch Music App on your device
  • Select the option whether you want to delete whole album or some certain music one by one
  • Now tap on the icon with three dots, and select Delete
  • Tap on Remove Download. If a music file available for online access only, you can tap Delete from My Music

How to Delete Movies or Videos from Videos App on iOS

Just like Music files, you can’t put Video files to Videos app without iTunes, but you can remove without iTunes following these steps
  • Launch Videos app on your device
  • Tap on Edit
Delete Movie iPhone
  • Tap the cross sign on the video you want to remove
Delete videos iPhone
  • Tap on Delete to confirm
Delete Video iOS

How to delete Photos and Videos from iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch (Photos App)

  • Launch Photos app on device
  • Tap on Camera Roll or any other folder to select photos/videos to delete
  • Tap Select, and select those photos and videos by tapping on them. All the selected items will have tick mark on them
  • Now tap on Delete icon, and the tap on Delete — Selected Photos
Note : If you have deleted any photos or videos by mistake, go back and tap on Recently Deleted. Now you can select and recover deleted photos. Those will go to the same folder/album where they belong.

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How to Loop Video with QuickTime Player on Mac OS X

QuickTime













Looping a video allows the movie to play repeatedly, and QuickTime makes video looping extremely simple for any video file on a Mac. This is a great movie playback feature for many purposes, but many users will find it particularly helpful for demonstration videos, tutorials, kiosks, or shorter video clips that are best enjoyed on repeat, like funny memes or cat videos.
Playing a video in a continuous loop is just a matter of selecting the loop option for that particular movie within QuickTime for Mac OS X, here’s all you need to do:

Looping a Played Video Repeatedly in QuickTime

  1. Open the video you want to play in a loop repeatedly within QuickTime Player on the Mac
  2. Pull down the “View” menu and choose “Loop”
  3. Start playing the video as usual, when the movie ends it will automatically start at the beginning again in a loop, playing endlessly and repeatedly until stopped, closed, or paused
Loop video playback in QuickTime for Mac
In the example video looped here, we’re taking a time lapse recording from an iPhone and playing it repeatedly in a loop.
Looping QuickTime video on Mac
QuickTime Player will even loop a video that is fast forwarding or set to play at a faster or slower playback rate, so even if you set a movie to play at 32x it will still loop repeatedly at that fast forward rate.
Some apps like VLC and MplayerX allow for looping forward and back and back to forward again, but QuickTime Player only allows video looping in the regular forward playback direction. Thus, when the video ends in QuickTime, it loops back to the beginning of the video and plays again from the start. There’s nothing wrong with that and that’s how most people want to repeat a video anyway, but the backward loop option is kind of nice, available in a variety of third party apps.
The QuickTime Player looping trick obviously requires a video to be stored locally on the Mac hard drive, or accessible through a network volume. Of course if the video you want to loop is online and accessible from the web, many web based video players allow the same playback features, and you can easily loop YouTube videos directly in the browser without any added software, and without downloading the video to the computer.
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Wednesday, April 6, 2016

First Betas of iOS 9.3.2, OS X 10.11.5, WatchOS 2.2.1, tvOS 9.2.1 Available for Testing

OS X El Capitan 10.11.5 beta  and iOS 9.3.2 beta
Apple has released a series of beta builds for system software, including iOS 9.3.2 beta 1 for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, OS X 10.11.5 beta 1 for Mac, WatchOS 2.2.1 beta 1 for Apple Watch, and tvOS 9.2.1 beta 1 for Apple TV. The point release beta updates are primarily focused on bug fixes and feature enhancements.
The current beta builds are available for developer testing, but will likely be released in the public beta programs shortly. Anyone can choose to participate in the public beta testing programs offered by Apple, but due to the less stable nature of beta software releases it’s generally only recommended for secondary hardware or advanced users who don’t mind the buggier beta experience.
iOS 9.3.2 beta, which arrives as build 13F51a, is available now for any iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch devices that are compatible with prior iOS 9 builds. The beta update is available now for users who are participating in the developer beta testing program through the Software Update mechanism on their devices, or through the Apple Developer Center.
iOS 9.3.2 beta 1
A first beta of OS X 10.11.5 for Macs arrives as build 15F18b and includes focuses on bug fixes and improvements to El Capitan. Mac users in the beta testing program can find the download through the App Store or through the OS X Developer Center on Apple.com.
OS X 10.11.5 beta 1
tvOS 9.2.1 arrives as build 13Y5752a and is compatible with Apple TV 4th generation (the latest model) only.
WatchOS 2.2.1 beta 1 for Apple Watch, and is also expected to include bug fixes, is available now as well.
The latest stable builds of system software for Apple hardware include iOS 9.3.1 for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touchOS X 10.11.4 for MacWatchOS 2.2 for Apple Watch, and tvOS 9.2 for Apple TV.
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How to Show Full Email Headers in Mail for Mac OS X

Mail app icon
Some users may wish to see the complete email header attached to email messages in the Mail app for Mac OS X. These long headers can reveal many details about the sender of an email message, including the origin mail servers and IP addresses, original arrival time, email alias details, and much more, making them a potentially valuable resource for some situations, particularly for users wishing to authenticate the validity of an email or mail message. Additionally, email header information can be very helpful for troubleshooting complicated email server issues.

The Mail app in Mac OS X makes it easy to display the complete email headers for mail messages, we’ll show you how to show the full header, return to the default header, and a rapid access keystroke to toggle the display of full email headers off and on quickly as needed.

Note this is generally best reserved for advanced users who understand how to interpret the email header data, as the average user will likely just find the email header to be unnecessary gibberish that complicates an email message.

How to Show Complete Email Headers in Mail for Mac OS X

This applies to all versions of Mail in all releases of Mac OS X system software:
  1. Open Mail app if you haven’t done so already and select or open any message in the inbox
  2. Pull down the “View” menu and go to “Message”, then select “All Headers”
  3. Show full long email header in Mail for Mac OS X
  4. Review the email header details at the top of the email message
You’ll find that email headers are generally quite lengthy as they are full of various details about the mail servers involved, content types, IP addresses, and much more.
Full email header shown in Mac Mail app
Again, the complete header detail data is not really meant to be interpreted by an average email user, this is generally best for advanced users who have some experience accurately interpreting and reading the header details, which often look like a bunch of hexadecimal nonsense, dates and times, server names, and IP addresses. But, as a general rule, users can determine if a message is authentic by reviewing the header for an email message and checking to see if the header information corresponds properly with who the sender claims to be. For example, if an email claims to be from Microsoft, all relevant header information for mail servers for that message should be from “microsoft.com” or a relevant subdomain. If the sender information or claim within an email does not match up with the email header information, you may have reasonable suspicion that the sender is not who they say they are, but again, this is a generalization and that is not always true.

Hiding Full Email Headers in Mail for Mac (the Default Header Display)

Had enough viewing the complete header and want to return to the default header view in Mail for Mac? That is just as easy:
  1. From the Mail app, select any email message as before
  2. Return to the “View” menu and choose “Message” and select “Default Headers”
Show regular email header in Mail for Mac OS X

Toggling Full / Short Email Headers with a Keystroke

Mac Mail users can also toggle the email header from the full complete header to the default short header, and vice versa, using Command + Shift + H from any email message.

Most Mac users will find that having the full headers shown for email message is quite unnecessary, but it can be helpful to toggle the display of the complete header on temporarily sometimes to validate an email, or to help rule out problems with email servers, and then toggle the display back off to return to the regular email header view again.

Source Url and Image: How to Show Full Email Headers in Mail for Mac OS X
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