Showing posts with label Development. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Development. Show all posts

Sunday, April 3, 2016

Best Mac Hex Editors

As a developer sometimes it is useful to see a hex dump of your files to make yourself aware of any errors that could occur while parsing the file. This list is compiled based on our experience with many hex editors and outlines the features of each. Based on your needs one might be better than another.
Our favorite hex editor for Mac OS X is 0xED by Suavetech. This editor has a host of formatting options and lets you edit files as both ASCII and hex. Another really cool feature for those working directly on binary data is the ability to change the value of each byte by manually entering the byte value in binary, decimal, and a few other formats. The editor window lets you also set the endianness when selecting multiple bytes when viewing the decimal values of each group of bytes.
mac hex editor
iHex is also a pretty solid hex editor but it lacks quite a few of the more advanced features that 0xED contains. If you are looking to simply edit a group of bytes or view their corresponding ASCII representations then iHex might be more of what you are looking for. If you are looking to work directly with binary data then 0xED might be the better choice.
Probably right on par with 0xED, synalize it has even more advanced features such as letting you define file formats in XML and have each file automatically parsed and color coded. If you are defining low level protocols and reading large logs of data then defining your format and dumping your hex logs into Synalize It might help your cause.
Source Url: Best Mac Hex Editors
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Thursday, March 24, 2016

Is C/C++ one or two languages?

Answer:

C++ diverged from C in 1982, and that's a long time in computer years. But, there are many C lib with C++ compatibility, including the C standard library itself, and a steady stream of programs are ported across from C to C++. Many C programmers only know or use the features that are compatible with C++.
They are defined by different ISO standards from separate committees. Even when they define compatible features, it is often defined in different terms.
Referring to C/C++ is about as valid as referring to Italian/Spanish. You should be careful to whom and when you use such a term. But it's true that there is diffusion of ideas in both directions, and the similarities are more than coincidence.
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