Tuesday, May 3, 2016

How to Add & Switch Languages in Mac OS X

Add a new language to Mac OS X
Nearly all Mac users run OS X in their primary language and mother tongue, but for polyglots and those aiming to be bilingual or trilingual, adding multiple new languages to Mac OS X can have obvious benefits. We’ll show you how to add a new language and how to change to that new language, which will impact how things appear and read on the Mac.
Adding a new language doesn’t remove the prior language, it becomes an additional option. In fact, you’ll have the ability to easily switch between the languages and set one or the other as a primary language at any time, and change between them as needed. Something else to keep in mind is that when you switch the language on a Mac, many things change with it, from menu items, to date format, measurements, and assorted other items through the system – these can all be adjusted individually if desired, but for our purposes in this tutorial we’re going to focus on adding and changing the language in Mac OS X.

How to Add & Change to a New Language to Mac OS X

You can add as many languages as you want, but in this walkthrough we’ll focus on just adding a second new language and changing to that as the new language default.
  1. From the  Apple menu visit “System Preferences”
  2. Choose “Language & Region” preference panel
  3. add a language to the Mac
  4. Under the ‘Preferred languages’ section, click on the plus [+] button
  5. add new languages to the Mac
  6. Navigate to and select the language you want to add, then click on the Add button
  7. choose the language to add to the Mac
  8. Decide whether you want to use the newly added language as your primary language, or to continue using the original language as the primary language
  9. use the new language as primary or secondary
That’s all there is to it, easy enough. If you set the new language as your primary language, menu items will refresh, but if you want everything to switch over to your new language choice then you should log out or reboot the Mac so that applications refresh to the new language selection as well.
Changed the language on a Mac
If you are actually going to use the secondary language full time or you are aiming to improve your proficiency, learning the keystrokes to change the keyboard language can be very advantageous, and adding an accompanying voice to the Mac can be beneficial as well.
By the way, if you’re looking to add multiple new languages that you can switch from, use the typical multiple-selection tools in Mac OS X to choose a few at a time. For example, holding down the Command key and clicking selections allows you to pick two noncontiguous language selections to add:
Add multiple new languages to Mac OS X to change to
While this is primarily aimed at those who speak and read multiple languages to begin with, it can also be very useful for people looking to improve their fluency in another language. For example, I have a friend who is becoming conversationally fluent in Spanish, and adding (and switching between) the language to daily computing use has further helped along that process.
You may also find it useful to add and change languages on iOS too if you’re an iPhone or iPad user.

 Source Url and Image: How to Add & Switch Languages in Mac OS X
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OS X 10.11.5 Beta 3, tvOS 9.2.1 beta 3, Released for Testing

Mac and iOS devices
Apple has released OS X 10.11.5 beta 3, tvOS 9.2.1 beta 3, watchOS 2.2.1 beta 3, along with a new Safari Technology Preview build for Mac users.

Additionally, Apple has released the public beta builds of iOS 9.3.2 beta 3 which was initially released yesterday for developers only.

No new features are expected in the beta releases, which look to primarily focus on bug fixes and improving the existing experience in Mac OS X, tvOS, watchOS, iOS, and Safari Tech Preview.
Those who are enrolled in the respective beta testing programs can find the appropriate downloads available now through the devices software update mechanism. Users can also choose to download the latest available beta versions from the respective Apple Developer websites.
OS X 10.11.5
Safari tech Preview
tvOS 9.2.1 beta 3
There is no known timeline for final versions of OS X 10.11.5, tvOS 9.2.1, iOS 9.3.2, or watchOS 2.2.1 to be released to the public, but Apple usually goes through a multitude of beta builds before issuing the final version of system software.

Source Url and Image:  OS X 10.11.5 Beta 3, tvOS 9.2.1 beta 3, Released for Testing
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Schedule Night Shift to Automatically Adjust Colors on iPhone

Schedule Night Shift in iOS
The Night Shift feature of iOS shifts the display color profile to be warmer, which reduces blue light output, and makes using an iPhone or iPad display much more pleasant in the later hours of the evening (or early morning). While you can toggle Night Shift mode on and off through Control Center anytime in iOS, perhaps a better approach is to set Night Shift to turn on automatically on a schedule, enabling itself as sunset, and turning itself off at sunrise.

This walk through will guide you in setting Night Shift to activate automatically on the sun schedule, though you can choose a custom time schedule as well if desired.

How to Set Night Shift to Schedule at Sunset & Sunrise Automatically in iOS

Night Shift scheduling requires a modern version of iOS (9.3 or later) to have the feature, otherwise it’s the same on any iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch. Here’s how it works:
  1. Open the ‘Settings’ app in iOS and go to “Display & Brightness”
  2. Tap on the “Night Shift” option underneath the Brightness section
  3. Now in the ‘Night Shift’ settings, flip the switch for “Scheduled” to the ON position
  4. In the “From / To” section, choose “Sunset to Sunrise” (you can set a custom schedule as well if desired)
  5. Set Night Shift to schedule from Sunset to Sunrise in iOS
  6. Return back to the Night Shift screen, and, optionally but highly recommended, set the “Color Temperature” to the “More Warm” setting furthest on the right
  7. Exit Settings and enjoy your automatic Night Shifting display
Now when sunset or sunrise comes, the iPhone / iPad display will automatically shift to be warmer, or back to the regular blue-light heavy display.
Night Shift on iPad
Even with Night Shift set on a schedule, you can continue to temporarily turn off or on Night Shift from Control Center in iOS as well, as shown in this gif:
Night Shift On and Night Shift Off on iPhone animated gif

Fix Night Shift Not Working, Scheduling Missing or Inaccessible

Some users may go to enable Night Shift only to discover the excellent scheduling feature is missing or inaccessible and grayed out. This is almost always due to a setting elsewhere on the device that determines if the Time Zone can be set by location services or not.
  1. Open the Settings app and go to “General” and then to “Location Services”
  2. Locate the switch for “Setting Time Zone” and be sure this is set to the ON position and enabled/li>
Night Shift scheduling requires time zone settings to be enabled in iOS
Now you can return to the Night Shift settings and the scheduling section will be enabled and accessible as intended. This is a good setting to keep enabled in general, it prevents the problem of time displaying wrong on iPhone and iPad if a device has changed time zones, or has been turned off for a long time.
By the way, for the Mac users out there, Flux offers a similar feature and color changing scheduling ability for MacOS X.

Source Url and Image: Schedule Night Shift to Automatically Adjust Colors on iPhone
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How to Hide Glances on Apple Watch

Glances on Apple Watch
Apple Watch includes a variety of default glances, including a battery monitor, heart rate monitor, a calendar, a media playback adjuster, stocks, maps, a world map, amongst others. Additionally, many of the apps installed onto Apple Watch include a Glance feature with them, which allows users to quickly see a glimpse of what that app offers without having to open the app itself. While some of these glances are helpful and useful, some aren’t, and if you install a fair amount of third party apps onto the Apple Watch you’ll quickly find the Glances screen to be busy.

A simple solution is to hide and disable Glances that you do not use or do not find useful on the Apple Watch, this is done quickly in settings.

Removing Unnecessary Glances on Apple Watch

  1. Open the Apple Watch app on the paired iPhone and go to ‘My Watch’
  2. Choose ‘Glances’, then tap on the red (-) minus button alongside the glance name that you wish to hide and no longer show on the Apple Watch Glances screen
  3. Repeat to adjust others as desired
  4. Exit out of the Apple Watch app on iPhone when finished
Hide Glances on Apple Watch
The changes take effect immediately on the paired Apple Watch. In the screen shot example, the Instagram and Twitter glances were not included on the Apple Watch Glances screen, but the apps themselves remain installed on the Apple Watch.
Returning a Glance back to the Glances screen on Apple Watch is just as easy, you simply need to return to the Glances settings section of the Apple Watch app, then tap on the green (+) plus button alongside a glance that you wish to re-enable again.

Source Url and Image: How to Hide Glances on Apple Watch
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How to Secure Erase Free Space on Mac Drives with OS X El Capitan

Erase free space on a Mac drive from the command line
Many Mac users running a modern version of OS X El Capitan have noticed the Secure Erase Free Space feature has gone missing from Disk Utility. What the “Erase Free Space” feature did (and still does in prior versions of Mac OS X) was overwrite the free space on a drive to prevent file recovery, adding a layer of security and privacy to file removal, much in the way that Secure Empty Trash performed a similar function of overwriting data after removal.

For those wondering, these features were removed from the modern version of Disk Utility in Mac OS X because they do not work on SSD volumes, which are becoming more commonplace and nearly all Mac laptops ship with them by default now. But not everyone has an SSD drive, and thus some users may still wish to perform a secure erase of free space on their Mac hard disk. To achieve the same secure erase in modern versions of Mac OS X you’ll need to turn to the command line. And yes, this works to erase free space on older versions of Mac OS X too, but since they can do the same task with Disk Utility it’s perhaps a bit less relevant to the prior releases.

This is for advanced Mac users only who are comfortable with backing up their Mac, using the command line with exact syntax, and the concepts behind permanently removing data. To be perfectly clear, this secure erases only the free space on a drive, aimed at preventing file recovery efforts, it does not perform a secure erase of the entire hard drive as described here.

How to Secure Erase Free Space on Mac OS X El Capitan Drives via Command Line, Without Disk Utility

Back up your Mac before attempting to use these commands. The command line requires precise syntax and is unforgiving, improper commands could lead to the unintended removal of data you do not want to delete, permanently, as this is a secure erase function. You have been warned, so backup your Mac data first, then proceed at your own risk.
To get started, launch the Terminal (found in /Applications/Utilities/) and use the following general syntax, replacing level and drive name as appropriate:
diskutil secureErase freespace (level 0-4) /Volumes/(Drive Name)
(level 0-4) is a number indicating the number of passes to write to the free space, ‘freespace’ indicates you are erasing only the free space and not the entire drive itself – a critically important difference – and (Drive Name) is self explanatory. Users can also choose the disk identifier if desired. If you aren’t sure of the name of the drive, using diskutil list will show you all mounted drives and partitions. If the drive in question has a space in the name, you should place it in quotes or escape it with backslashes.
For example, to perform a secure erase with 35 passes on free space on a drive named “Macintosh HD” you could use the following command string:
diskutil secureErase freespace 3 "/Volumes/Macintosh HD"
Hitting return will instantly begin the secure erase of any free space. This is irreversible, so as we’ve mentioned a dozen times already, be sure the syntax is exact.
Secure erase free space on a Mac hard drive from the command line
The manual page entry on diskutil offers the following details on the secure erase feature, detailing the level of writing over free space.
secureErase [freespace] level device
Erase, using a secure method, either a whole-disk (including
any and all partitions), or, only the free space (not in use
for files) on a currently-mounted volume. Erasing a whole-
disk will leave it useless until it is partitioned again.
Erasing freespace on a volume will leave it exactly as it was
from an end-user perspective, with the exception that it will
not be possible to recover deleted files or data using utility
software. If you need to erase all contents of a partition
but not its hosting whole-disk, use the zeroDisk or randomDisk
verbs. Ownership of the affected disk is required.
Level should be one of the following:
o 0 – Single-pass zero-fill erase.
o 1 – Single-pass random-fill erase.
o 2 – US DoD 7-pass secure erase.
o 3 – Gutmann algorithm 35-pass secure erase.
o 4 – US DoE algorithm 3-pass secure erase.
That’s all there is to it, and this is how you can continue to erase free disk space on a Mac running OS X El Capitan or later with the newly limited Disk Utility. Another option is to use an old version of Disk Utility in modern versions of Mac OS X, either from a boot drive or recovery mode, of an older Mac OS release, or with the application itself, but that is generally not recommended.
And yes, this works on both standard hard disk drives with spinning platters, and modern SSD disks, though with an SSD drive the feature is less relevant as TRIM / garbage collection should handle the file removal on it’s own. For SSD volumes, a better option is to enable and use FileVault disk encryption on the Mac, which encrypts data on the drive making it unrecoverable without the FileVault key, thus obviating the need to securely erase free space on the volume.
Know of any other helpful secure data removal tips or tricks, or another way to securely erase your free disk space in modern versions of Mac OS X? Let us know in the comments.

Source Url and Image: How to Secure Erase Free Space on Mac Drives with OS X El Capitan
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3 of the Best Disk Space Analyzers for Mac OS X

Disk space storage analyzer apps for Mac
It’s often only a matter of time before Mac users wind up seeing the dreaded “startup disk almost full” warning message in Mac OS X, which often leads to a frantic dash around the Downloads folder as users trash unnecessary files to attempt to free up disk space. While there’s nothing wrong with going on a manual mission of tracking down where your disk storage vanished to, there are an entire category of disk space analyzer apps available which make the job easier, offering a visual experience that is quickly scannable and actionable.

We’ll cover three of the best and most popular disk space analysis tools available for the Mac, each of which is either free or offers a free trial version to give a good test run with.

A big thing to remember with using these disk analyzer apps is that if you shouldn’t delete anything without discretion, as they sweep the entire drive and inevitably display system files, system folders, and other necessary components of Mac OS X and apps, along with personal documents and accumulated cruft. It’s a good idea to back up the Mac with Time Machine before using these apps if you’re planning on performing some mass file removal, it’s always better to be safe than sorry and lose files or have to reinstall Mac OS X if you deleted critical system files willy-nilly.

DaisyDisk

DaisyDisk is by far the most attractive storage analysis utility, with a beautiful and intuitive interface that makes finding disk clutter a matter of navigating an interactive colorful wheel. In terms of visualization of your file data, DaisyDisk is superior to anything else available, and it’s also very fast.
DaisyDisk analyzes disk storage space on a Mac in a very attractive easy manner
The free version of DaisyDisk is highly functional and will sweep your drive and allow simple quick access to any files or folders found (right-click on anything and choose ‘Show in Finder’), and you could get away with just using the free version if you wanted to, but if you enjoy DaisyDisk enough and find it to be a helpful companion to your Mac experience, the full version is money well spent.

OmniDiskSweeper

OmniDiskSweeper is great and the interface is quite similar to using the Finder in Column view, making it very easy to navigate to large files and folders throughout the file system hierarchy. The files are shown in descending order by size, so it’s very easy to figure out what’s eating up storage space.
OmniDiskSweeper helps analyze and track down large files on a Mac
OmniDiskSweeper has long been one of my favorite free utilities available for the Mac, and I use it often for my own computer and when trying to figure out what’s eating the disk space of other Macs I may encounter. We have discussed using OmniDiskSweeper before here on multiple occasions, it’s a great tool.

Disk Inventory X

Disk Inventory X has been around on the Mac for quite some time, it is an oldie but goodie. Though the interface could use some updating, the functionality remains high and the app works great for discovering large blocks of data (for example, a gazillion photos or zip archives). Perhaps the only issue is that in modern versions of Mac OS X, files can be assigned to the app they open with rather than their file type, which may lead to some confusion. Nonetheless, Disk Inventory X is free too, so if you decide it’s not your cup of tea you’re out nothing but a few mb of bandwidth.
DiskInventoryX
A significant perk of DiskInventoryX having been around for ages is that it’s widely supported on much earlier versions of Mac OS X, so if you’re working on an older Mac with earlier system software, this may be the solution you’re looking for.

Bonus: The Finder!

If you don’t want to download any third party utilities, or perhaps you can’t for whatever reason, the Mac search function within the Finder is able to find large files in Mac OS X too. You’ll just need to set a minimum file size to look for, and away it goes.
Finding large file size files in Mac OS X search
The Finder search function works reasonably well for this purpose, but for many Mac users they will find one of the above third party utilities to be easier to quickly scan for large groups of files on a drive with.
Know of any other great utilities to analyze disk storage space and files on a Mac? Let us know in the comments!

Source Url and Image:  3 of the Best Disk Space Analyzers for Mac OS X
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How to Disable (or Enable) True Tone Display on iPad Pro

How to Disable True Tone Display on iPad Pro
The display on the new iPad Pro includes a feature called True Tone, which uses ambient light sensors to automatically shift and change the displays color hue and intensity according to the surrounding light, shifting from cooler to warmer as the surrounding lighting environment changes. It’s kind of like a smarter real-time adapting version of Flux for Mac or Night Shift for iPhone, and it’s definitely a great feature on the iPad Pro for users who take the device into different lighting conditions on a regular basis. It’s a handy enough display feature that it’s likely coming to upcoming iPhones and Macs as well, but for now it’s baked into the latest iPad Pro only.

Perhaps the only problem with the True Tone Display is if you’re trying to perform color accurate work, since the on screen color will look different to you as the display shifts it’s hue. Accordingly, designers, artists, and even this who just like to sketch for fun, may want to toggle the True Tone color display off or on as needed.

Disable or Enable the True Tone Display on iPad Pro

True Tone Display is enabled by default on iPad Pro, here is how you can quickly toggle the color shifting feature off or on again with the iPad Pro:
  1. Open the “Settings” app on iPad and go to “Display & Brightness”
  2. Under the “Brightness” setting, locate “True Tone” and flip the switch the OFF or ON position as desired
  3. Exit out of Settings
Enable or Disable True Tone Display on iPad Pro
Assuming True Tone is actively adjusting the color of the display, the effect is instantaneous when you turn the feature off or on, and you will almost certainly notice the screen color shift to be warmer (sepias) or cooler (blues) on the iPad.
The animated GIF below demonstrates True Tone display in effect, shifting colors on an iPad Pro as the surrounding color tone differs, captured from an Apple product video demonstrating the feature:
True Tone Display off and on shifting colors on iPad Pro
For most users it’s a good idea to leave their iPad True Tone display enabled, it is the default setting for the feature for a reason, since it undoubtedly improves the screen reading experience, and there is plenty of research out there about the effects of blue light which are less than flattering. Nonetheless, for artists, designers, and even just those who like to draw or sketch in Notes will likely find the toggle switching a handy feature to flip True Tone on and off as their use case requires.
True Tone is a great feature, at the moment it’s available on the iPad Pro 9.7″ display model but it’s undoubtedly coming to the larger 12″ version, and as we mentioned before, it’s probably going to show up on the iPhone Plus, and it wouldn’t be totally crazy to see a similar color shifting display feature arrive on future MacBook Pro models as well. In the meantime, other iPad and iPhone users can enable Night Shift in iOS (better yet, schedule Night Shift to turn on automatically) for a similar albeit different color shifting experience and make their screen display look warmer.

Source Url and Image: How to Disable (or Enable) True Tone Display on iPad Pro
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